Goods and service tax, Indian economy

 

ABSTRACT

By:Vishwanath Achari

GST also known as the Goods and Services Tax is defined as the giant indirect tax structure designed to support and enhances the economic growth of a country. More than 150 countries have implemented GST so far. However, the idea of GST in India was mooted by Vajpayee government in 2000 and the constitutional amendment for the same was passed by the Loksabha on 6th May 2015 but is yet to be ratified by the Rajyasabha. However, there is a huge hue and cry against its implementation. It would be interesting to understand why this proposed GST regime may hamper the growth and development of the country.

 

Keywords – Goods and service tax,Indian economy

 

 

INTRODUCTION

The Goods and Services Tax (GST) is a vast concept that simplifies the giant tax structure by supporting and enhancing the economic growth of a country. GST is a comprehensive tax levy on manufacturing, sale and consumption of goods and services at a national level [1]. The Goods and Services Tax Bill or GST Bill, also referred to as The Constitution (One Hundred and Twenty-Second Amendment) Bill, 2014, initiates a Value added Tax to be implemented on a national level in India. GST will be an indirect tax at all the stages of production to bring about uniformity in the system.

On bringing GST into practice, there would be amalgamation of Central and State taxes into a single tax payment. It would also enhance the position of India in both, domestic as well as international market. At the consumer level, GST would reduce the overall tax burden, which is currently estimated at 25-30%.

IMPACT OF GST ON MANUFACTURERS, DISTRIBUTOR AND RETAILERS

GST is expected to boost competitiveness and performance in India’s manufacturing sector. Declining exports and high infrastructure spending are just some of the concerns of this sector. Multiple indirect taxes have also increased the administrative costs for manufacturers and distributors and it is being hoped that with GST in place, the compliance burden will ease and this sector will grow more strongly.

IMPACT OF GST ON SERVICE PROVIDERS

As of March 2014, there were 12, 76,861 service tax assesses in the country out of which only the top 50 paid more than 50% of the tax collected nationwide. Most of the tax burden is borne by domains such as IT services, telecommunication services, Insurance industry, business support services, Banking and Financial services etc. These pan-India businesses already work in a unified market, and while they will see compliance burden becoming lesser there will apparently not be much change in the way they function even after GST implementation.

 

LOGISTICS

In a vast country like India, the logistics sector forms the backbone of the economy. We can fairly assume that a well organized and mature logistics industry has the potential to leapfrog the “Make In India” initiative of the Government of India to its desired position.

E-COM

The e-com sector in India has been growing by leaps and bounds. In many ways, GST will help the e-com sector’s continued growth but the long-term effects will be particularly interesting because the model GST law specifically proposes a tax collection at source (TCS) mechanism, which e-com companies are not too happy with. The current rate of TCS is at 1% and it’ll remain to be seen if it dilutes the rapid boom in this sector in any way in the future.

PHARMACY

On the whole, GST is expected to benefit the pharmacy and healthcare industries. It will create a level playing field for generic drug makers, boost medical tourism and simplify the tax structure. If there is any concern whatsoever, then it relates to the pricing structure (as per latest news). The pharmacy sector is hoping for a tax respite as it will make affordable healthcare easier to access by all.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

In the telecom sector, prices are expected to come down after GST. Manufacturers will save on costs through efficient management of inventory and by consolidating their warehouses. Handset manufacturers will find it easier to sell their equipment as GST will negate the need to set up state-specific entities, and transfer stocks. The will also save up on logistics costs.

TEXTILE

The Indian textile industry provides employment to a large number of skilled and unskilled workers in the country. It contributes about 10% of the total annual export, and this value is likely to increase under GST. GST would affect the cotton value chain of the textile industry which is chosen by most small medium enterprises as it currently attracts zero central excise duty (under optional route).

REAL ESTATE

The real estate sector is one of the most pivotal sectors of the Indian economy, playing an important role in employment generation in India. The probable impact of GST on the real estate sector cannot be fully assessed as it largely depends on the tax rates. However, it is a given that the sector will see substantial benefits from GST implementation, as it will bring to the industry much required transparency and accountability.

AGRICULTURE

Agricultural sector is the largest contributing sector the overall Indian GDP. It covers around 16% of Indian GDP. One of the major issues faced by the agricultural sector, is transportation of agri products across state lines all over India. It is highly probable that GST will resolve the issue of transportation. GST may provide India with its first National Market for the agricultural goods. However, there are a lot of clarifications which need to be provided for rates for agricultural products.

FMCG

The FMCG sector could see significant savings in logistics and distribution costs as the GST will eliminate the need for multiple sales depots. The GST rate for this sector is expected to be around 17% which is way lesser than the 24-25% tax rate paid currently by FMCG companies. This includes excise duty, VAT and entry tax – all of which will be subsumed by GST.

FREELANCERS

Freelancing in India is still a nascent industry and the rules and regulations for this chaotic industry are still up in the air. But with GST, it will become much easier for freelancers to file their taxes as they can easily do it online. They will be taxed as service providers, and the new tax structure will bring about coherence and accountability in this sector.

AUTOMOBILES

The automobile industry in India is a vast business producing a large number of cars annually, fueled mostly by the huge population of the country. Under the current tax system, there are several taxes applicable on this sector like excise, VAT, sales tax, road tax, motor vehicle tax, registration duty which will be subsumed by GST. Though there is still some ambiguity due to tax rates and incentives/exemptions provided by different states to the manufacturers/dealers for manufacturing car/bus/bike, the future of the industry looks rosy.

STARTUPS

With increased limits for registration, a DIY compliance model, tax credit on purchases, and a free flow of goods and services, the GST regime truly augurs well for the Indian startup scene. Currently, many Indian states have very different VAT laws which can be confusing for companies that have a pan-India presence, specially the e-com sector. All of this is expected to change under GST with the only sore point being the reduction in the excise limit.

BFSI

Among the services provided by Banks and NBFCs, financial services such as fund based, fee-based and insurance services will see major shifts from the current scenario. Owing to the nature and volume of operations provided by banks and NBFC vis a vis lease transactions, hire purchase, related to actionable claims, fund and non-fund based services etc., GST compliance will be quite difficult to implement in these sectors.

WHY NO TO GST?

However, the question is: is the picture as rosy as it is portrayed?

Wall Street firm Goldman Sachs, in a note ‘India: Q and A on GST — Growth Impact Could Be Muted’, has put out estimates that show that the Modi Government’s model for the Goods and Services Tax (GST) will not raise growth, will push up consumer prices inflation and may not result in increased tax revenue collections

There appears to be certain loopholes in the proposed GST tax regime which may be detrimental in delivering the desired results. They are:

India has adopted dual GST instead of national GST. It has made the entire structure of GST fairly complicated in India. The centre will have to coordinate with 29 states and 7 union territories to implement such tax regime. Such regime is likely to create economic as well as political issues. The states are likely to lose the say in determining rates once GST is implemented. The sharing of revenues between the states and the centre is still a matter of contention with no consensus arrived regarding revenue neutral rate.

Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian on 4 December 2015 suggested GST rates of 12% for concessional goods, 17-18% for standard goods and 40% for luxury goods which is much higher than the present maximum service tax rate of 14%. Such initiative is likely to push inflation.

The proposed GST structure is likely to succeed only if the country has a strong IT network. It is a well-known fact that India is still in the budding state as far as internet connectivity is concerned. Moreover, the proposed regime seems to ignore the emerging sector of e-commerce. E-commerce does not leave signs of the transaction outside the internet and has anonymity associated with it. As a result, it becomes almost impossible to track the business transaction taking place through internet which can be business to business, business to customer or customer to customer. Again, there appears to be no clarity as to whether a product should be considered a service or a product under the concept of E-commerce. New techniques can be developed to track such transactions but until such technologies become readily accessible, generation of tax revenue from this sector would continue to be uncertain and much below the expectation. Again E-commerce has been insulated against taxation under custom duty moratorium on electronic transmissions by the WTO Bali Ministerial Conference held in 2014.

Communication is considered to be necessity and one cannot do without communication. In modern times, communication has assumed the dimension of telecommunication.

The proposed GST regime appears to be unfavorable for telecommunication sector as well

“One of the major drawbacks of the GST regime could be the direct spike in the service tax rate from 14% to 20-22%” (GST: Impact on the Telecommunications Sector in India). The proposed GST appears to be silent on whether telecommunication can be considered under the category of goods or services. The entire issue of telecommunication sector assumes a serious proportion when India’s rural teledensity is not even 50%.

The proposed GST regime intends to keep petroleum products, electricity, real estate and liquor for human consumption out of the purview of GST. It is a well-known fact that petroleum products have been a major contributor to inflation in India. Inflation in India depends on how the government intends to include petroleum products under GST in future.

Electricity is essential for the growth and development of India. If electricity is included under standard or luxury goods in future then it would badly affect the development of India. It is said that GST would impact negatively on the real estate market. It would add up to 8% to the cost of new homes and reduce demand by about 12%.

The proposed GST regime “would be capable of being levied on sale of newspapers and advertisements therein”

This would give the governments the access to substantial incremental revenues since this industry has historically been tax free in its entirety”. It sounds ridiculous but the provision of GST is likely to make the supervision of operations by its Board/senior managers across the company’s offices in different parts of the country a taxable service by allowing each state to raise a GST demand on the company.

Again there appears to be lack of consensus over fixing the revenue rate as well as threshold limit. One thing is for sure, services in India are going to be steeply costly if GST is fixed above the present service tax rate of 14% which in turn will spiral up inflation in India. “Asian countries which implemented GST all had witnessed retail inflation in the year of implementation.

CONCLUSION

The proposed GST regime is a half-hearted attempt to rationalize indirect tax structure. More than 150 countries have implemented GST. The government of India should study the GST regime set up by various countries and also their fallouts before implementing it. At the same time, the government should make an attempt to insulate the vast poor population of India against the likely inflation due to implementation of GST. No doubt, GST will simplify existing indirect tax system and will help to remove inefficiencies created by the existing current heterogeneous taxation system only if there is a clear consensus over issues of threshold limit, revenue rate, and inclusion of petroleum products, electricity, liquor and real estate. Until the consensus is reached, the government should resist from implementing such regime. Experts have enlisted the benefits of GST as under:

It would introduce two-tiered One-Country-One-Tax regime. It would subsume all indirect taxes at the center and the state level. It would not only widen the tax regime by covering goods and services but also make it transparent. It would free the manufacturing sector from cascading effect of taxes, thus by improve the cost-competitiveness of goods and services. It would bring down the prices of goods and services and thus by, increase consumption. It would create business-friendly environment, thus by increase tax-GDP ratio. It would enhance the ease of doing business in India.

1 comment for “Goods and service tax, Indian economy

  1. Ranjan
    July 21, 2017 at 6:12 am

    Valuable article

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